The new Shetland midwater trawler Adenia LK 193 started to prove her fishing credentials on North Sea herring within a week of being welcomed home to Whalsay and then rigging out at Lerwick, reports David Linkie

Skipper George Anderson and Adenia’s crew reported that the vessel’s electronic, hydraulic and mechanical systems, together with the midwater gear, performed well from the word go, as they began to familiarise themselves with the working characteristics of their new boat, in preparation for the tougher challenges that inevitably lie ahead during the coming winter mackerel fishery.

Adenia was designed by Salt Ship Design and built at Bilbao by Astilleros Zamakona Pasaia SL for the family-owned Adenia Fishing Company Ltd in partnership with LHD Ltd of Lerwick.

Adenia

Adenia replaces the owners’ previous vessel of the same name, which was sold to her new Norwegian owners Fosnavaag Havfiske AS in February 2018 and renamed Nordsjobas. This vessel was built in 2003 by Flekkefjord Slipp & Maskinfabrikk AS and lengthened by 8.4m to 70.3m in Gdansk and Skagen by Karstensens in 2015, at the same time as being reconfigured to pump pelagic fish over the stern.

Adenia Fishing Logo

Maximising catch quality, crew safety and comfort, and working efficiency were identified as the main priorities at the start of the three-year design and build project.

Having taken the decision to build again, skipper George Anderson gave the design of the new Adenia into the safe hands of his longstanding friend Karl Sandvik of Salt Ship Design.

Skipper George Anderson said: “Building Adenia in 2003, and later lengthening the hull and changing over to pumping aft, provided a good starting point as to where we wanted to go with the new boat. Having put our ideas together, which included more working room for pumping aft, more comfortable working conditions and optimising fish quality, we then discussed these with Karl Sandvik.

“The design process started with the working arrangements on the aft deck. When these related building blocks were in place, focus was then given to the delivery of fish to the RSW tanks amidships, along with the associated refrigeration and pumping systems.

“On achieving solutions we were happy with for the main working areas, attention turned to the wheelhouse and internal accommodation spaces, which fortuitously dovetailed in well.

General view of fish-handling arrangements amidships.

General view of fish-handling arrangements amidships.

“Karl Sandvik’s open-minded approach and relaxed manner when discussing our requirements were invaluable in ensuring that we got what we wanted, and incorporating this into a modern streamlined vessel.

“Encountering 40-knot winds on the delivery passage gave an early opportunity for Adenia to show her seakeeping qualities, which she did in style. The Salt team have done what they said they would in designing a very capable boat.

“Maintaining continuity is essential for any business. Fishing is no exception, regardless of whether it is fishing opportunities, market requirements, embracing new technology or crewing. Adenia Fishing Company continues to be extremely fortunate in having an extremely experienced and loyal crew, some of whom have sailed with us for 30-plus years. Without their continued support and that of our families, this project would not have been possible.

Grated walkways lead fore and aft either side of the central MMC double seawater separator unit.

Grated walkways lead fore and aft either side of the central MMC double seawater separator unit.

“Whalsay and Shetland have a long and proud tradition of fishing, and for the benefit of our local community, it is essential that we do everything possible to continue for future generations, which is why new boats such as Adenia are being built for pelagic and whitefish partnerships in Shetland.”

Interestingly, the new Adenia is slightly shorter than her predecessor, and 2.1m beamier. In addition to maximising the deck and internal space available, increasing the beam also contributes to a vessel retaining the maximum amount of freeboard throughout a trip, thereby further promoting crew and vessel safety.

Skipper George Anderson.

Skipper George Anderson.

Naval architects calculate the sinkage by load for any vessel in terms of tonnes per centimetre (TPC), and this is directly proportional to the waterplane area. Initial calculations undertaken by Salt Ship Design showed that increasing the beam and therefore the buoyancy of the underwater hull would significantly increase the TPC, thereby reducing the reduction in freeboard when fish are pumped into the RSW tanks.

The efficiency of the round bilge hull form drawn up by Karl Sandvik, in which the beam is carried well forward to the shoulders, in combination with the vessel’s centreline propulsion package, is shown by the fact that Adenia recorded a top speed of 17.6 knots on sea trials off the north coast of Spain.

Having reached general agreement on the design, the owners then considered their options in relation to shipyards. Given their preference for Adenia to be built and completed at the same yard, George Anderson and his partners, who include his three sons Josie, Michael and Stuart, opted for the Zamakona yard in Bilbao.

Skipper George Anderson said: “Two years down the line, this decision has been fully justified by both the build quality and the high level of support we received from the yard throughout the project. Excellent working relations were quickly established for all-round mutual benefit, as the end result shows. We would have no hesitation in placing another order with Zamakona tomorrow. The yard delivered exactly what we wanted: a practical working vessel in which every piece of equipment will help us to take out quotas as efficiently and economically as possible.

“Particular focus was given to keeping everything simple and straightforward, in order to ensure maximum reliability at all times.”

General arrangement

With a length between perpendiculars of 61.8m, 15.6m of beam, a depth to main deck of 9.5m and a scantling draught of 7.9m, Adenia’s round bilge hull was built to Det Norske Veritas +1A1 Ice-C Fishing Vessel classification.

Cook Michael Anderson’s well-equipped galley…

Cook Michael Anderson’s well-equipped galley…

Adenia effectively features three continuous decks: main, shelter and forecastle, on which a 60t anti-roll tank is located forward, together with a streamlined compartment housing the anchor windlasses and mooring winches.

In order to provide maximum protection for crewmen monitoring the delivery of fish to the RSW tank coamings amidships on the shelterdeck, when Adenia is pumping fish, the hull sides are continued up to the vessel’s bold sheerline.

… and chilled dry provisions room, which leads to walk-in refrigerated and freezer rooms.

… and chilled dry provisions room, which leads to walk-in refrigerated and freezer rooms.

Continuous side decks run the full length of the vessel. A wide central grating walkway is arranged either side of the double-ended fish separator between the anti-roll tank and the messdeck/day lounge in the accommodation superstructure.

A profiled boat deck extends aft of the rounded wheelhouse. Together with a double radar gantry mounted on top of a ski-box housing, this contributes to Adenia’s stylish appearance.

With a capacity of 2,160m³, Adenia’s 10 RSW tanks are arranged from forward in four tiers: three tiers of two and one of four. The three middle tiers are positioned adjacent to the hull sides at main deck level, to create a large central area in which the vessel’s vacuum landing plant is housed.

The wet gear crew changing room is arranged along the port side of the hull...

The wet gear crew changing room is arranged along the port side of the hull…

When running off to fish, Adenia will usually have around 1,200t of seawater in the RSW tanks.

Below the main (third) deck, the hull is subdivided into forepeak, bow thruster/sonar room, forward insulated RSW tanks, pump room, aft tier of RSW tanks, engineroom/auxiliary engineroom (port), and aft peak with lube/hydraulic oil and fuel tanks.

… and is adjacent to a coffee/tea room.

… and is adjacent to a coffee/tea room.

At main (second) deck level, the arrangements from forward are forepeak, refrigeration plant room and vacuum pump room (flanked by RSW tanks), aft tier of four RSW tanks, engine control/switchboard room, engine workshop stores (port), four single and one twin-berth cabins and gym (starboard), and hydraulic pump room/steering gear compartment room.

Layout on the shelter (first) deck consists of forepeak store, harbour genset room, tank tops with delivery pipes for RSW tanks, deckhouse for fish sampling, and pumping and vacuum landing control screens. Three single and one twin-berth cabins are arranged along the starboard side of the hull, in close proximity to the boat’s main laundry room. A dry change room and smokers’ lounge are positioned inboard of the deck change wardrobe, which extends the full length of the deck casing to port, with access onto the trawl deck.

At forecastle deck level, the day lounge is located to starboard of the adjoining expansive messdeck, which is served by a single elliptical table on the vessel’s centreline. A hospital cabin is situated aft of the TV lounge.

Featuring low-maintenance modern composite work surfaces, cook Michael Anderson’s well-equipped galley lies to port forward of a large chilled dry provisions room that also gives access to adjacent walk-in refrigerated and freezer stores.

Four single-berth cabins, together with an instrument room and secondary laundry facilities, are arranged on the next level up (boat deck), directly below the wheelhouse.

Featuring light linings that enhance the spacious feel throughout the boat, all the accommodation areas onboard Adenia are finished to high levels of specification and workmanship.

Midwater trawling arrangements

Norwegian specialist MacGregor supplied a comprehensive package of hydraulic deck machinery to Adenia, which was installed and commissioned by engineers from the company’s Peterhead division.

The MacGregor 90t split trawl winches mounted at the sides of the boat deck…

The MacGregor 90t split trawl winches mounted at the sides of the boat deck…

The midwater trawling units are located on two levels on the shelter and forecastle decks, in a customised arrangement in line with the owners’ requirements. This arrangement includes a slightly longer than usual trawl deck, which gives the crew maximum space when dealing with any twists in the bag, and for general net repairs. The layout also enables the crew to have full sight of hauling and shooting operations at all times.

Two 90t core pull split trawl winches are positioned close to the hull sides directly abaft the accommodation casing on the forecastle deck.

… are fitted with electric spooling-on gear.

… are fitted with electric spooling-on gear.

Protected by the boat deck sidewalks, the split trawl winches, together with the net sounder winch atop the gantry, function through a Rapp Marine PTS-Pentagon CbusFH system.

Featuring electrically operated guiding-on gear, each winch is spooled with 2,200m lengths of 38mm-diameter Bridon Dyform wire, supplied by LHD Ltd.

The underspooled trawl wires have straight leads to inboard hanging blocks suspended on the underside of the stern gantry.

Integrated into the stern construction of Adenia, the port leg of the single-level trawl gantry is set well inboard on the port side, leaving the maximum amount of space for handling the fish pump.

Two underspooled net drums are arranged at boat deck level.

Two underspooled net drums are arranged at boat deck level.

Midwater trawls are worked from two 90t net drums positioned between, and aft of, the split trawl winches on the forecastle deck. Midwater trawls are underspooled onto the drums over large-diameter stainless steel rollers mounted on the underside of the forecastle deck.

The elevated net drums enable the crew to quickly remove damaged fish when clearing the taper.

Electro-hydraulic pumps for the deck machinery are housed in a dedicated room on the main deck.

Electro-hydraulic pumps for the deck machinery are housed in a dedicated room on the main deck.

Two outhaul winches are mounted aft on the wraparound forecastle deck under the stern gantry, for use when shooting away the bag and for other duties on the trawl deck. When fishing in poor, heavy weather, the central opening through which midwater trawls are worked can be sealed off by raising a hydraulically operated gate, positioned aft of the four customary guiding-on pins. The in-use and spare toe-end chain weights are worked from double sets of deck tracks served by a pivoting gate.

An 80t topline winch is located on the starboard side of the shelterdeck. The lifeline has a short direct lead to a hanging block mounted on the underside of the wraparound forecastle deck. The owners opted for this arrangement, which keeps the lifeline as low to the water as possible, to promote catch quality by making it easier to spill fish back to the bag.

Down to business: Adenia manoeuvring in Lerwick harbour while rigging out.

Down to business: Adenia manoeuvring in Lerwick harbour while rigging out.

A second advantage is enhancing working efficiency, as it eliminates the need to pass tails and pennants round the trawl doors.

A 57t tail-end winch, used for pulling the bag to the stern before the sock is taken up and attached to the fish pump, is stepped on the wide port forecastle deck aft of the split trawl winch. Aligned inboard of the hydraulic hose reel and the fish pump, the tail-end rope leads through a dedicated roller built into the port leg of the stern gantry.

Three remote-controlled Karm deck cranes are also fitted. Two are positioned atop the trawl gantry; one is a net stacker crane for general gear-handling duties, while the second crane is dedicated to the handling of the fish pump. A 4t/14.5m knuckle-boom crane covers the foredeck.

Adenia’s deck machinery is powered by six 160kW, three 132kW, two 128kW and one 40kW electro/hydraulic power packs situated in the full-width pump room on the main deck aft.

Fish pumping

Delivery pipe arrangements to the aft two tiers of RSW tanks.

Delivery pipe arrangements to the aft two tiers of RSW tanks.

At the end of a successful tow, catches of herring and mackerel are taken aboard aft on the port side of Adenia, before the fish are pumped forward to the MMC double dewatering system set into the forecastle deck amidships.

SeaQuest Systems of Killybegs supplied two of their well-proven 24in fish pumps as part of a full package of fish pumping equipment. This included a SeaQuest 20in pump-through fish hose reel, a hydraulic hose reel with added guide-on gear, and fish hose complete with connections and 20in stainless steel swivels.

Ten RSW tanks have a combined capacity of 2,160m³.

Ten RSW tanks have a combined capacity of 2,160m³.

When the 24in SeaQuest pump is lowered into the water by the dedicated overhead Karm crane and the bag is slackened off, 80m of 20in fish hose is spooled off the drum.

The fish hose permanently connected to the pump sits in a deep captive vertical slot in the port side of the transom, allowing the hose to run clear of the stern as the pump is lowered into the water by the dedicated overhead crane.

Adenia’s crew ready for action. Back row, left to right: Stuart Shearer, Brian Laurenson, skipper George Anderson, Stuart Anderson, Ivor Polson and Raymond Fraser. Front row: Scott Reid, Leonard Reid, Josie Anderson, Michael Anderson, Jim Smith and Kevin Nicholson.

Adenia’s crew ready for action.
Back row, left to right:
Stuart Shearer, Brian Laurenson, skipper George Anderson,
Stuart Anderson, Ivor Polson and
Raymond Fraser. Front row:
Scott Reid, Leonard Reid,
Josie Anderson,
Michael Anderson, Jim Smith
and Kevin Nicholson.

The customary large-diameter stainless steel delivery pipe is mounted on the underside of the forecastle deck before it is routed inboard towards the bottom of the fish/seawater separator system.

A short clear Perspex section (the looking glass) incorporated into the first section of the main pipe allows the flow of fish to be constantly monitored, either from the deck or via CCTV coverage in the wheelhouse, where skipper George Williamson can take full control of fish pumping operations from a dedicated console directly in line with the port quarter.

When pumping, the flow of pelagic fish from the separator into the 10 RSW tanks is remotely controlled from the secondary deckhouse.

On entering the water separator, fish are directed upwards before sliding either forward or aft into transverse troughs, from where they are directed to either side through stainless steel pipes to enclosed receiving boxes. Three pipes controlled by vertically operated knife gates deliver fish to the selected aft RSW tanks directly through the shelterdeck, thereby keeping the tank tops clear for easy visual inspection.

 Two 1,150kW MMC refrigeration plants are housed on the main deck forward.

Two 1,150kW MMC refrigeration plants are housed on the main deck forward.

Two delivery pipes lead fish to the first two tiers of tanks from the forward receiving boxes.

Constant sample weighing of fish is carried out when Adenia is pumping using Marel M2200 electronic scales and pelagic sampling software.

With buyers worldwide, particularly in Japan, requiring ever-higher standards of catch quality, the owners placed particular emphasis on Adenia landing a top-quality product by being able to reduce the temperature of pelagic fish entering the RSW tanks down to an optimum storage temperature of between 0°C and 1°C as quickly as possible.

Azcue 880m³/hour RSW pumps and main delivery pipes.

Azcue 880m³/hour RSW pumps and main delivery pipes.

Two ammonia-based refrigeration plants, supplied by MMC, produce 1150kW of cooling capacity, enabling pelagic catches to be brought down to the desired level in often under two hours, depending on the quantity of fish pumped aboard and the number of RSW tanks brought into use. The RSW system is served by two 800m³/hour circulation pumps and two 300m³/hour condenser pumps.

The distribution of pelagic fish into the RSW tanks, through tank sounding and pump and valve control when pumping, is handled by an MMC computer control and monitoring system.

Pelagic catches from Adenia are discharged to processing factories ashore by twin MMC 4,200-litre vacuum pumping systems. Operated by four 66kW compressor units, the systems have a discharging capacity of up to 2 x 200t per hour.

Engineroom

Adenia’s Rolls-Royce Bergen Diesel B33:45 main engine…

Adenia’s Rolls-Royce Bergen Diesel B33:45 main engine…

Adenia is powered by a Bergen Diesel B33:45 main engine of 5,400kW @ 750rpm. Coupled to a Brunvoll Volda gearbox of 7.28:1 reduction, it turns the 4,000mm-diameter CP propeller at 103rpm.

A PTO on the gearbox drives a Nidec Leroy-Somer shaft generator delivering 2,700ekW @ 1,200rpm.

A key feature of Adenia’s engineroom is the amount of space available, both in terms of area and volume. Extending the engineroom into the main deck provided generous height clearance above the main engine. This will provide ease of access for servicing in years to come, in conjunction with the overhead lifting track, as well as ensuring a high level of cooling air circulation.

… and Brunvoll Volda 7.28:1 reduction gearbox and Nidec Leroy-Somer 2700ekW shaft generator.

… and Brunvoll Volda 7.28:1 reduction gearbox and Nidec Leroy-Somer 2700ekW shaft generator.

Additional electrical power on Adenia is provided by two Yanmar 6EY18 (A) LW auxiliary engines (994kW @ 900rpm), running 800ekW Taiyo 440/3/60 generators housed in a dedicated room on the port side of the main engine.

A Scania DI 13075M harbour genset of 300ekW is located in the forepeak.

Two Brunvoll tunnel thrusters of 950kW, in which skewed bladed propellers combine optimal thrust with low noise, assist vessel handling in confined areas and when keeping station to fishing gear.

The lengths to which the owners have gone in order to maximise fuel efficiency for the future is highlighted by the presence of a heat recovery system in the engineroom. When the main engine is running, the Alfa Laval unit delivers recovered heat to the vessel’s PyroMarine hot water boiler. When Adenia is in harbour, the transfer of heat can be reversed to warm the main engine.

The combination of double bottom and deep fuel tanks allows 470,000 litres of fuel to be carried. The vessel’s domestic freshwater capacity is 60,000 litres.

Engineers Brian Laurenson, Josie Anderson and Raymond Fraser monitor the performance of all the vessel’s propulsion and generating machinery, catch storage, and the comprehensive alarm systems from a separate soundproofed control room and office, when sharing 24-hour watch duties. All functions onboard Adenia are constantly monitored by the latest all-embracing vessel management system developed by NORIS Automation GmbH, for which Trevor McDonald (Marine Engine Services) Ltd of Ellon is the Scottish agent.

Williamson’s wheelhouse electronics supply and installation

Two views of Adenia’s wheelhouse…

Two views of Adenia’s wheelhouse…

H Williamson & Sons Ltd of Scalloway, Shetland designed, supplied, installed and commissioned the extensive array of electronic equipment now performing well on Adenia.

The wheelhouse, like the other internal accommodation areas on Adenia, features an efficient and practical layout, in which every item of equipment justifies its presence. The light-coloured interior linings and consoles are complemented by the natural-effect wooden flooring to give a modern appearance.

… in which H Williamson & Sons supplied and installed a comprehensive array of electronic equipment.

… in which H Williamson & Sons supplied and installed a comprehensive array of electronic equipment.

The fishing and navigation position straddles the vessel’s centreline. Two island units, from which most of the electronic units can be operated, are positioned between three NorSap 1600 chairs. Six 26in Hatteland monitors are flush-mounted in the main forward console. A further eight display screens are arranged in two separate flanking consoles.

Four 24in monitors are positioned above the forward windows.

Freestanding consoles, which come into play when Adenia is manoeuvring in confined areas, are located at the forward corners of the wheelhouse.

Dedicated separate midwater trawl shooting/hauling and fish pumping consoles aft provide a commanding view of all fishing activities across the stern.

A relaxing day area is arranged to port, forward of a central open-plan office desk.

Adenia is equipped with a comprehensive array of Simrad underwater acoustic equipment units.

Long-range detection of fish is handled by a Simrad SN92H split-beam high-frequency 70-120kHz multibeam 180° sonar.

For medium- and close-range echo detection, skipper George Anderson uses Simrad SC90 (70-90kHz) and Simrad SU94 (20-30kHz) medium and low-frequency omni-sonars, providing excellent clarity on smaller marks coming off the bottom.

Vertical echo detection is performed by three Simrad ES80 split-beam low/medium/high sounders operating through two dual processors.

When tracking marks in heavy weather, heave compensation for the sonars and sounders is provided by a Kongsberg MRU-3 motion reference unit.

The performance of Adenia’s midwater trawls when towing is monitored by a Wesmar TCS385-300 trawl sonar operating through the cable winch atop the gantry. Having previously been fully satisfied with the results returned by the lightweight Wesmar unit, which one man can put into the net pocket, skipper George Anderson had no hesitation about opting for Wesmar again.

Vessel manoeuvring consoles are located on either side of the wheelhouse.

Vessel manoeuvring consoles are located on either side of the wheelhouse.

Navigation requirements are handled by a Telko Furuno FMD3200 BB electronic chart display and information system (ECDIS), supported by two type-approved Furuno BB radars, together with a Furuno solid-state Doppler DRS6NXT unit. This radar is also interfaced to a TimeZero plotter, one of three chart plotting systems installed on Adenia – the others being Olex and Sodena TurboWin.

GPS and heading data is provided by two Furuno GP-170 type-approved GPS receivers, a Simrad dual GC80 gyrocompass and a Simrad Pro AP80 dual-head autopilot system.

AIS information is handled by the latest-model Furuno FA-170, and a Furuno CI-68 Doppler current indicator provides tidal data at five different depths.

A Furuno BR-500 watch alarm system gives peace of mind to the skipper and crew when Adenia is steaming to and from the fishing grounds.

A full Sailor GMDSS package was also installed by Williamson’s, including 6310 MH/HF 150W radiotelephone, 6222 Class A VHFs, Entel HT649 handheld VHFs, Furuno Felcom 18 Sat C and Furuno NX700B Navtex. Jotron EPIRBs and SARTs were also fitted.

Man-to-man communication when Adenia is fishing is handled by Icom F1000 PMR units built into the Geko protective helmets worn by the crew during fishing operations.

KT Nets supplies two new midwater trawls

Adenia berthed at Killybegs…

Adenia berthed at Killybegs…

Adenia called into Killybegs on her passage home to Whalsay from Bilbao to pick up a new package of midwater gear made by Danny Gallagher and the KT Nets team.

This included two 1,280m-circumference mackerel trawls. The first of a new design by KT Nets, the midwater trawls are made from Enkalon nylon with eight-panel back ends and incorporate 12.8m and 6.4m meshes and Capto and Combi-Twist in the front end.

… taking on one of two of a new design of 1,280m mackerel midwater trawls that KT Nets supplied as part of an extensive package of fishing gear.

… taking on one of two of a new design of 1,280m mackerel midwater trawls that KT Nets supplied as part of an extensive package of fishing gear.

KT Nets also supplied a 70m eight-panel wide brailler, together with a lifeline, ancillary items and spares for the mackerel trawls.

Adenia is using a set of Vónin Tornado 7.5m²/3,000kg pelagic doors to spread the midwater trawls, which also include a Swan Net-Gundry 1,100m herring net that performed consistently well on her predecessor.

Vónin’s extensively researched Tornado pelagic doors are reported to have pushed trawl door technology to new levels, with a sophisticated construction that brings together five foils with the company’s patented flow booster, precisely managing and accelerating the flow of water through and past the doors’ surfaces to maximise lift.

LHD Ltd supplied two 2,200m lengths of 38mm-diameter Bridon Dyform wire to Adenia. These were spooled onto the split trawl winches under tension while Adenia was berthed on Mair’s Quay, in front of the LHD wire store and new net-making premises.

Scanmar ScanScreen catch control and gear monitoring

Adenia is equipped with a Scanbas 365 catch-/net-monitoring system supplied and installed by Shetland agents H Williamson & Sons.

Four Scanmar SS4 super-catch sensors, ready to be fitted to the tunnel section.

Four Scanmar SS4 super-catch sensors, ready to be fitted to the tunnel section.

A combination of wide digital receivers (WDRs) and the latest 365 software allows the wide range of door and net sensors to be configured from the multi-display units in the wheelhouse.

Adenia has all catch-control information displayed across two screens. The first screen relays information from the front of the trawl, and the second screen provides information based on the target species as they travel down the bag into the codend.

A wide-beam Trawl Eye positioned in the tunnel section provides continually updated information on the location and movement of fish towards the brailler, on which four SS4 super-catch sensors are fitted.

Adenia has mounted an SS4 depth sensor with ‘filling indicator’ on the aft side of the splitter to monitor the bag when hauling.

Skipper George Williamson, who has worked closely with Scanmar for a number of years to help develop the benefits of using sensors to monitor the tunnel section of midwater trawls, will be trialling Scanmar’s new Trawleye later this year.

Scanmar SS4 distance sensors complete with door angle functions are also mounted on the Vónin trawl doors.

Sensor signal reception while trawling is collected from four H4B30X50 single-beam hydrophones, mounted on both port and starboard blister housings.

Four QBC-X1 charging units are mounted in a readily accessible store forward of the trawl deck.

 

 

 

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